Cortisol: The Stress, Aging and Obesity Hormone

by Michael Cheikin

Stress. We all know what it feels like. We also know that it affects our health, but how?

Understanding Stress

Stress is defined in terms of a system pushed to its limits. For example, bridges are designed to handle the stress of a fixed weight, and no more. However, living systems, when subjected to normal amounts of stress, grow stronger. In fact, stress is necessary for optimal development, growth and fun. Homework and sports are examples of how controlled stress, or challenge, makes us better. All systems of our body are designed to handle stress and grow stronger (even into old age) so that we can survive and procreate.  Continue reading

What is Neurofeedback?

by David Piltz

Emotional and physical health are often discussed in terms of symptoms and solutions to symptoms. For example, attention deficit disorder (ADD) is diagnosed by a list of chronic symptoms and then treated with the appropriate combination of medication, behavior modification and therapy. Continue reading

What is ‘Text Neck’?

Smart phones. Tablets. Laptops. With the increasing popularity and accessibility of technology, we are seeing an increase in physical problems associated with overuse. One of the ailments is “text neck”.

Text neck is a term used to describe neck and upper back pain that results from looking down at our screens. This action, done frequently or for prolonged periods of time, can result in neck strain as well as start to change the curve of the neck.  Continue reading

Healing Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Experiencing a traumatic event does not mean we will have PTSD. We are programed to process these events. If the process is interrupted, however, the energy of our response to the event becomes frozen and can turn into PTSD. The severity of the traumatic event varies with age and support systems.  Continue reading

Take a Stand Against Sitting

It’s a world of sitting. Sitting in a car, at a desk or on a couch, Americans spend approximately six to eight sedentary hours each day, according to the American Heart Association.

The body is meant to move. The joints, bones, muscles and organs thrive on the physiological effects of motion. The simple act of supporting one’s own body weight by standing can spark vital molecular activity.

All of that seated time affects the body.  Continue reading

Personal Reflections: The Art of Breast Massage

by Lyn Hicks

My gynecologist told me long ago to massage my breasts so I could find lumps and changes in them. I didn’t do it very much, because who wants to find a lump? I would not be honest about it, either—I knew it was important, but the premise created fear, not sacredness of understanding my body. I know many woman feel the same.

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Lyme Realities: Real Talk About a Real Disease

If you live or have lived in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut or anywhere in the northeast, you are at risk for tick-borne illness. If you feel fatigue, migrating joint or muscle pain, have memory problems, confusion or difficulty sleeping, you may have tick-borne illness. If you are not eating lots of fruits and vegetables, exercising regularly and managing your physical or mental stress, you are at risk for tick-borne illness.

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Fresh Starts for Wellness

Spring is generally associated with new beginnings and fresh starts. While new beginnings in nature, such as flowers emerging through the soil, happen with ease, when it comes to human behavior, fresh starts sometimes require more effort and attention. One area where it is worth cultivating new perspectives is health and wellness.

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Meet Rosie: Healing Through Yoga

For 17 years, Rosie Lazroe has been healing through yoga. It began in the spring of 2001, when she found herself laying in a hospital emergency room with a resting heart rate over 150 bpm. As the ER nurse was about to inject medication to reboot her heart rhythm, Rosie felt a cold rush flow through her body and then faintly heard her dad tell her to open her eyes. After receiving a second injection, her heart rate slowed down.

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The Good Side of Cholesterol

by Dian Freeman

Few words today can bring about more discussion and debate than the word “cholesterol”. The discussion generally centers around how high or how low one’s personal cholesterol levels are, while the debate generally addresses the best way to lower those numbers or even on how to eliminate cholesterol altogether. Such discussions and debates are based both upon misinformation and the lack of information about the value of cholesterol to the body. Continue reading