Babying Mom: Benefits Of Chiropractic Care During Pregnancy

by Katie Samsel

Women experience all kinds of exciting changes during pregnancy, but unfortunately some changes bring aches and pains with them. In fact, 50 percent of women report having lower back pain during pregnancy. Chiropractic care can help. Chiropractic adjustments are a safe, drug-free way to alleviate not only back pain, but also some of the other pregnancy ailments that may present themselves, while simultaneously helping the body function optimally.

Here are a few things chiropractic care can address:

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Learn About Accessing Healing Through Access Bars

The International School of Shiatsu will host Dr. Jay Clauss for an Introduction to Access Bars class from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on April 10. This class offers a lead-in for Access Bars training classes that will be offered in June, August and October, each providing eight continuing education hours.

The Bars are a series of 32 points on the head that, when lightly touched by a practitioner, help release old feelings, thoughts and emotions that no longer serve the participant—even those stored over multiple lifetimes. Accessing the Bars involves accessing consciousness, and the experience is both calming and nurturing.

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The Good Side of Cholesterol

by Dian Freeman

Few words today can bring about more discussion and debate than the word “cholesterol”. The discussion generally centers around how high or how low one’s personal cholesterol levels are, while the debate generally addresses the best way to lower those numbers or even on how to eliminate cholesterol altogether. Such discussions and debates are based both upon misinformation and the lack of information about the value of cholesterol to the body. Continue reading

Warrington Chiropractor Donates Coats, Care

LifeAligned Upper Cervical Chiropractic, in Warrington, is hosting a winter coat drive for the month of November.

Through its “give and receive” offer, anyone can donate a new or slightly used winter coat at the LifeAligned office, and in return for their generosity receive $250 in services, to include a doctor consultation, examination, upper cervical X-ray study and a report of findings. Readers should call in advance to schedule their appointment.

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Inspired Chiropractic with Andrew Persky

“I came to chiropractic later in life than many doctors. I had a 20-year background in computer-based image analysis and robotics, worked for the world’s leading developer of this technology, and was awarded a patent for my method of determining the orientation of three-dimensional (3D) objects based on two-dimensional (2D) images.”

–Andrew Persky, DC, founder of LifeAligned Upper Cervical Chiropractic

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Inspired Chiropractic with Suzanne Walski

Suzanne Walski, DVM, has been serving the community since 1987 and is certified with the American and Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Associations, the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association, the American Association of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and the American Holistic Veterinary Medicine Association. She owns and practices at Meadowbrook Animal Healing and is co-founder of The Room at Meadowbrook, both in Ottsville.

What complementary modalities are you trained in?

I am a conventionally schooled veterinarian with additional education in other forms of healing principles. In veterinarian school, I was not taught anything about keeping the spine mobile. It was when I took an intensive animal certification program alongside human chiropractors that I gained my expansive view on how the body can “heal thyself into a healthy self”.

How do you use these treatment options in your practice?

Most of the time, clients seek out my services when their pet is limping or when their dog has been diagnosed with a back issue that causes pain and mobility issues, or has chronic issues that have not responded to medications.

I look at holistic care as everything involved with the pet, especially food, environment and stress level, along with the physical ailment. I believe in medications because you must put out a fire before the house can be rebuilt, and yes, surgery may be necessary to correct a condition.

When an animal is on medications, my goal is to slowly wean it off the drugs, if possible. If the owner decides to have surgery, I use chiropractic treatments to prepare the animal’s body by making sure the spine/nervous system is working to its best potential.

What misconceptions do people have about animal chiropractic?

When people learn that I perform spinal manipulation on animals, the response is often, “I didn’t know you could do chiropractic on animals.” The funny part is that I, too, did not know this until I started the chiropractic journey for my personal health 20 years ago. Any animal with a spine can be adjusted if it allows you to touch it. So, yes, chiropractic care is for animals, too, and is especially great for horses!

Meadowbrook Animal Healing is located at 4089 Durham Rd., Rte. 412, Ottsville. For more information, call 610-847-2776 or visit SuzanneWalskiDvm.com. October 2017

Inspired Chiropractic with Katie Samsel

Katie Samsel, DC, is a licensed chiropractic physician and founder of Samsel Integrative Health, in Langhorne. Throughout her years of training, certification and experience, she has committed to helping patients achieve pain relief by using the most advanced and effective chiropractic techniques available, in addition to a variety of complementary modalities.

What complementary modalities are you trained in?

I have had training in several different complementary modalities over the course of my career, including applied kinesiology (AK), nutrition, Neuro-Emotional Technique (NET), Kinesio Taping and, most recently, ayurvedic medicine.

How do you use these treatment options in your practice?

Primarily, I use AK to determine what the best approach is for each patient on each visit, and commonly, more than one treatment option will be used. I do the chiropractic/physical exam first, then check to see if any nutrition may be needed to help with healing. I also consider whether or not Kinesio Taping can help support the muscles/joint and, lastly, if there is an emotional component. From there, I develop a treatment plan.

When and why did you start incorporating these modalities into your practice?

I started with an interest in diet and nutrition as a teenager and went on to get an undergraduate degree in dietetics and nutrition prior to pursuing my chiropractic education. In my first semester at chiropractic school, I discovered AK, which tied together chiropractic with nutrition and an emotional component. It seemed like a perfect fit for what I wanted to do with my career, and I started studying AK after my first year in chiropractic school.

After graduating, I wanted to further develop the third leg of AK, the emotional part, and pursued learning NET. Only in the last four years did I start to delve into ayurvedic medicine, which I find fascinating and believe will only improve my ability to help and serve my patients.

The nutrition and emotional work have served me and my patients well over the years, allowing me to take a truly holistic approach. I have found that using these other modalities to support chiropractic care has given patients faster, longer-lasting results, and I’m excited to continue to learn new things to further serve my clients.

Location: 305 Corporate Dr. E., Langhorne. For more information, call 215-944-8424, email Drs@SamselHealth.com or visit SamselHealth.com. October 2017

Inspired Chiropractic with Jeff Griffin

Jeffrey Griffin, DC, is the founder of the Center for Natural Healing, in Doylestown, and has been practicing chiropractic for more than 35 years. He specializes in using the Loomis System of enzyme nutrition in combination with chiropractic techniques to ease pain and achieve optimal health for his patients.

What other complementary modalities are you trained in?

Besides chiropractic, I have advanced training and diplomate status in maternity care and pediatrics through the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association. I’ve also completed training as a certified wellness practitioner through the International Chiropractic Association and have advanced training with the Loomis Institute as a digestive health practitioner. I also received certification as an internal health care provider through Logan College of Chiropractic, which focuses on multiple internal disorders associated with the human body.

When and why did you start incorporating these modalities into your practice?

A little over 15 years ago, I began blending my knowledge as a chiropractor and my training from Dr. Howard Loomis of the Loomis Institute. He helped “pull it all together” into a system of diagnosis and treatment that easily puts me on the ballfield and, in most cases, allows me to hit a home run with my patients’ health care.

What sets integrative chiropractors apart from traditional chiropractors?

Nothing against other chiropractors that focus specifically on the spinal adjustment. I get it… that’s what we all went to chiropractic school for—to learn how to identify and treat structural issues. But what if that’s not where your patient’s neck or back pain is coming from? Being able to look beyond structural issues to identify the source of stress allows me to add depth to the services I offer my patients.

How do you work in partnership with other medical providers in an effort to create a comprehensive health plan for your patients?

Partnering is never an issue. In fact, I enjoy it because, in most cases, the primary physician has already ruled out disease. In situations of disease, medication will work best. But what if no disease is found, yet the patient is symptomatic? These are the patients I love to treat. Clearly, they have no disease process but their body isn’t functioning normally. This is where a practitioner such as myself can look at things from a different angle that often reveals the source of the stress. Once you locate the source of stress, then the treatment becomes obvious.

Location: 252 W. Swamp Rd., Ste. 26, Doylestown. For more information, call 215-348-2115 or visit Center4NaturalHealing.com. October 2017

Many Paths To Healing: Exploring Modern Mental Health Practices, Treatments and Modalities

by Karen L. Smith, Rebecca Antsis and Karen G. Meshkov

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Life is not without its ups and downs. At some point in the journey, we will likely be presented with circumstances that upset our mood and behavior. Though many tools and resources are available that can help us on our path to optimal mental health, the first challenge is figuring out what kind of help we need, and where we can get it.

As an advocate of integrative, holistic and complementary approaches to healing, Natural Awakenings offers this guide as our attempt to survey the contemporary healing landscape and raise awareness of the myriad resources available to those seeking inroads to a more emotionally healthy, happy and balanced life.

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Stress Signals: Listen to Lessen

by Christine Tentilucci

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The term “mind-body connection” can evoke a multitude of subjective definitions. One interpretation is the relationship between mental stress and physical health. Research illustrates that stress that affects the mind directly relates to the health of the body. Therefore, mind-body awareness — remaining aware of how our mental and emotional state correlates to experiences within the body — can be a valuable tool in managing the stress response.

When reacting to stressors, the body releases cortisol, known as the “stress hormone”. If the mind is in a continual state of stress, the cortisol level remains constantly elevated, wreaking havoc on a number of the body’s functions. Chronic stress has been linked to digestive disorders, suppressed immune function, internal inflammation and even cancer.

Women’s health is significantly tied to the body’s delicate balance of hormones, which includes cortisol. This is why decreasing the stress response, and conversely increasing the relaxation response, is a key component of women’s health. These are just a few ways increased stress can affect women’s health:

Periodic Periods. Considering cortisol is part of the hormonal system, it’s no wonder that stress may cause irregular periods.

Bouts of Blemishes. Ever wonder why pimples often pop up during times of stress? Raised cortisol levels can cause excess oil production, contributing to acne breakouts.

Tummy Trouble. Prolonged stress can increase stomach acid, causing indigestion, discomfort and the potential development of IBS or ulcers.

Distressed Sleep. Mental stress and the accompanying mind chatter can be a sleep-interrupter. Plus, a common side effect of increased cortisol is a pattern of waking up during the night. Lack of sleep can lead to fogginess, irritability and low energy, causing more stress and continuing the cycle. The body’s functions rest and reset during the sleep cycle, making healthy sleep a n important part of lowering the stress response.

Weight Woes. Research has linked heightened levels of cortisol to weight gain and belly fat. In addition, stress may trigger emotional eating and increased cravings. To add insult to injury, cortisol-related weight gain can be difficult to reverse, making weight loss a more challenging task.

Seeking advice from a trusted healthcare provider is important for any woman that thinks stress and cortisol may be affecting her health, but mind-body awareness should also remain integral to her day. Take time to stop, breathe deeply and be aware, and then explore ways to turn down the volume on stress.

Christine Tentilucci is the marketing manager for Inner Spa, a fully organic, holistic, eco-friendly wellness spa in Newtown. For more information, call 215-968-9000, email Christine@InnerSpa.org, or visit InnerSpa.org and InnerVitalitySpa.com.

May 2016 Issue

Matters of the (Female) Heart: 10 Things Women May Not Know About Heart Disease

CRG_AbingtonCardio_DrMeshkov_0216_1by Arnold B. Meshkov

  1. Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States.
  2. The incidence of heart disease has been increasing in women for the last 30 years.
  3. Women may not have the typical symptoms of cardiac chest pain, or angina pectoris, as a symptom of a blocked artery or atherosclerosis.
  4. Often, the only symptoms women may experience are shortness of breath and fatigue.
  5. When women do experience cardiac chest pain, it is often due to problems with the very small blood vessels of the heart, and not due to atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries.
  6. Heart disease in women presents on average about 10 years later than in men; with the population living much longer now, women without any history of heart problems are presenting with heart disease for the first time much later in life.
  7. Women are treated with invasive procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac surgery less often than men.
  8. Women have the same risk factors for heart disease as men, such as family history, cigarette smoking, “metabolic syndrome”, elevated cholesterol and lipids, high mental stress levels, high blood pressure (hypertension), being overweight and diabetes.
  9. Women have a significant risk of heart disease after menopause, but treatment with estrogens has been shown to increase that risk even further.
  10. Women are much more likely to suffer from “broken heart syndrome”, which presents with the typical symptoms of a heart attack but is not due to hardening of the arteries, and is often associated with major life stress events.

Arnold B. Meshkov, MD, is board certified in internal medicine, cardiology and echocardi-ography. For more information, call 215-920-0815, email Info@AbingtonCardiology.com or visit AbingtonCardiology.com.

May, 2016 Issue

Thyroid Health and Menopause: A Naturopathic Approach

by Lynn W. Feinman

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A woman’s natural life cycle presents an ever-changing landscape of potential health issues. Hormones, in particular, can be affected by the milestones of puberty, childbirth and menopause. Menopause-related hormone imbalance can be increasingly problematic due to lowered functioning of an aging thyroid, a gland that plays a large role in regulating hormones.

Thyroid imbalances can cause weight issues, anxiety and depression, fatigue, skin and hair changes, indigestion, sleep issues and more. Since thyroid imbalances can also be caused by autoimmune diseases and can have a genetic component, or can even be triggered by viruses, the first step in treating imbalances should always involve a proper medical diagnosis. Once the diagnosis is made, a naturopathic treatment plan can be created.  Because no part of the human body operates independently of the rest of the body, a holistic perspective is essential when addressing thyroid issues.

A founding naturopathic principle holds that if the body is in proper balance, it can tolerate the fluctuation of hormones. Traditional naturopathy considers the health of all major organ systems in the body, acid/alkaline balance and naturopathic detoxification. Specifically, naturopathy seeks to remove offenders (allergens), replace what nutrients might be missing and repair damage (inflammation). While a naturopathic approach to hormonal imbalance considers many factors, including exercise , stress and emotions, nutrition and sleep play a central role in restoring health.

Research shows that certain nutrients can nourish the thyroid gland, such as antioxidants and the herbs ashwagandha, schisandra and ginseng. Additionally, women  experiencing menopause benefit from specific nutrients, such as B vitamins and minerals.

Adding to the nutritional challenge, certain foods, especially when refined, often become  difficult to digest as we age. Eating more plant-based foods can be beneficial, with the caveat that soy and wheat are not nourishing foods for the thyroid and are common allergens. Engaging in nutritional cleansing can help reduce overload in the liver, the essential organ that manages hormonal fluctuations.

The lack of restorative sleep often underlies all other health challenges, especially during menopause. Naturo-pathic approaches integrate sleep hygiene, restoring sleep cycles and nourishing the nervous system. Commonly used herbs include chamomile, passion flower, valerian and skullcap.  Supplements may include melatonin and minerals, which help to calm the body. Since sleep is a naturally occurring human phenomenon, natural sleep cycles can usually be restored, depending on how long the imbalance has occurred.

Aging is a natural part of life, but with the proper whole-system approach to changing needs, delicate balances can be not only maintained, but enriched.

Lynn W. Feinman, owner of Natural Health Options, in Paoli, is a naturopathic doctor and yoga instructor specializing in health recovery and detoxification programs. For more information, call 610-608-1430 or visit NaturalHealthOptions.us.

May 2016 Issue