Letter from the Publisher, November 2017

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“Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass;
it’s about learning to dance in the rain.”

As we approach the season of Thanksgiving, I’m internalizing some hearty lessons about loss, gratitude, resilience and transcendence.

The chasm between the nightly news and my own life closed the night that Hurricane Maria destroyed the town where my colleagues, Natural Awakenings Puerto Rico publishers Luis Mendez and Waleska Sallaberry, have built a vibrant, thriving holistic health community over the past 15 years.

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Elizabeth Joyce Offers Psychic Fair this Fall

Author, psychic and energetic healer Elizabeth Joyce is organizing a Fall Psychic Fair, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., November 4 and 5. Event takes place at the James Lorah House, 132 North Main Street, Doylestown.

The Fall Psychic Fair benefits Bucks County charities and offers attendees different forms of massage and bodywork, including reiki and vibrational healing. Lectures are scheduled every hour beginning at noon, as well as opportunities to receive readings from several local and guest psychics, including Frank St. James of Psychic Detectives and Celeste Oliver, a descendant of the founders of modern spiritualism, the Fox sisters.

“Feel good about yourself and learn how to transform your life with the many holistic services available,” says Joyce. “Meet others in your community and network!”

Cost: $5 donation, $7 lunch, all services extra, free parking. For more information and to register, call 215-996-0646, email Elizabeth_Joyce@verizon.net or visit New-Visions.com. November 2017

Law Offices of Jennifer J. Riley

The Law Offices of Jennifer J. Riley has been recognized by the Law Firm 500 Award committee as one of the fastest growing law firms in the country. The 2017 Law Firm 500 Award Honorees list showcases the top 200 fastest-growing law firms in the United States and has ranked the Law Offices of Jennifer J. Riley at number 20. Continue reading

Inspired Chiropractic with Andrew Persky

“I came to chiropractic later in life than many doctors. I had a 20-year background in computer-based image analysis and robotics, worked for the world’s leading developer of this technology, and was awarded a patent for my method of determining the orientation of three-dimensional (3D) objects based on two-dimensional (2D) images.”

–Andrew Persky, DC, founder of LifeAligned Upper Cervical Chiropractic

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Inspired Chiropractic with Suzanne Walski

Suzanne Walski, DVM, has been serving the community since 1987 and is certified with the American and Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Associations, the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association, the American Association of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and the American Holistic Veterinary Medicine Association. She owns and practices at Meadowbrook Animal Healing and is co-founder of The Room at Meadowbrook, both in Ottsville.

What complementary modalities are you trained in?

I am a conventionally schooled veterinarian with additional education in other forms of healing principles. In veterinarian school, I was not taught anything about keeping the spine mobile. It was when I took an intensive animal certification program alongside human chiropractors that I gained my expansive view on how the body can “heal thyself into a healthy self”.

How do you use these treatment options in your practice?

Most of the time, clients seek out my services when their pet is limping or when their dog has been diagnosed with a back issue that causes pain and mobility issues, or has chronic issues that have not responded to medications.

I look at holistic care as everything involved with the pet, especially food, environment and stress level, along with the physical ailment. I believe in medications because you must put out a fire before the house can be rebuilt, and yes, surgery may be necessary to correct a condition.

When an animal is on medications, my goal is to slowly wean it off the drugs, if possible. If the owner decides to have surgery, I use chiropractic treatments to prepare the animal’s body by making sure the spine/nervous system is working to its best potential.

What misconceptions do people have about animal chiropractic?

When people learn that I perform spinal manipulation on animals, the response is often, “I didn’t know you could do chiropractic on animals.” The funny part is that I, too, did not know this until I started the chiropractic journey for my personal health 20 years ago. Any animal with a spine can be adjusted if it allows you to touch it. So, yes, chiropractic care is for animals, too, and is especially great for horses!

Meadowbrook Animal Healing is located at 4089 Durham Rd., Rte. 412, Ottsville. For more information, call 610-847-2776 or visit SuzanneWalskiDvm.com. October 2017

Inspired Chiropractic with Katie Samsel

Katie Samsel, DC, is a licensed chiropractic physician and founder of Samsel Integrative Health, in Langhorne. Throughout her years of training, certification and experience, she has committed to helping patients achieve pain relief by using the most advanced and effective chiropractic techniques available, in addition to a variety of complementary modalities.

What complementary modalities are you trained in?

I have had training in several different complementary modalities over the course of my career, including applied kinesiology (AK), nutrition, Neuro-Emotional Technique (NET), Kinesio Taping and, most recently, ayurvedic medicine.

How do you use these treatment options in your practice?

Primarily, I use AK to determine what the best approach is for each patient on each visit, and commonly, more than one treatment option will be used. I do the chiropractic/physical exam first, then check to see if any nutrition may be needed to help with healing. I also consider whether or not Kinesio Taping can help support the muscles/joint and, lastly, if there is an emotional component. From there, I develop a treatment plan.

When and why did you start incorporating these modalities into your practice?

I started with an interest in diet and nutrition as a teenager and went on to get an undergraduate degree in dietetics and nutrition prior to pursuing my chiropractic education. In my first semester at chiropractic school, I discovered AK, which tied together chiropractic with nutrition and an emotional component. It seemed like a perfect fit for what I wanted to do with my career, and I started studying AK after my first year in chiropractic school.

After graduating, I wanted to further develop the third leg of AK, the emotional part, and pursued learning NET. Only in the last four years did I start to delve into ayurvedic medicine, which I find fascinating and believe will only improve my ability to help and serve my patients.

The nutrition and emotional work have served me and my patients well over the years, allowing me to take a truly holistic approach. I have found that using these other modalities to support chiropractic care has given patients faster, longer-lasting results, and I’m excited to continue to learn new things to further serve my clients.

Location: 305 Corporate Dr. E., Langhorne. For more information, call 215-944-8424, email Drs@SamselHealth.com or visit SamselHealth.com. October 2017

Inspired Chiropractic with Jeff Griffin

Jeffrey Griffin, DC, is the founder of the Center for Natural Healing, in Doylestown, and has been practicing chiropractic for more than 35 years. He specializes in using the Loomis System of enzyme nutrition in combination with chiropractic techniques to ease pain and achieve optimal health for his patients.

What other complementary modalities are you trained in?

Besides chiropractic, I have advanced training and diplomate status in maternity care and pediatrics through the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association. I’ve also completed training as a certified wellness practitioner through the International Chiropractic Association and have advanced training with the Loomis Institute as a digestive health practitioner. I also received certification as an internal health care provider through Logan College of Chiropractic, which focuses on multiple internal disorders associated with the human body.

When and why did you start incorporating these modalities into your practice?

A little over 15 years ago, I began blending my knowledge as a chiropractor and my training from Dr. Howard Loomis of the Loomis Institute. He helped “pull it all together” into a system of diagnosis and treatment that easily puts me on the ballfield and, in most cases, allows me to hit a home run with my patients’ health care.

What sets integrative chiropractors apart from traditional chiropractors?

Nothing against other chiropractors that focus specifically on the spinal adjustment. I get it… that’s what we all went to chiropractic school for—to learn how to identify and treat structural issues. But what if that’s not where your patient’s neck or back pain is coming from? Being able to look beyond structural issues to identify the source of stress allows me to add depth to the services I offer my patients.

How do you work in partnership with other medical providers in an effort to create a comprehensive health plan for your patients?

Partnering is never an issue. In fact, I enjoy it because, in most cases, the primary physician has already ruled out disease. In situations of disease, medication will work best. But what if no disease is found, yet the patient is symptomatic? These are the patients I love to treat. Clearly, they have no disease process but their body isn’t functioning normally. This is where a practitioner such as myself can look at things from a different angle that often reveals the source of the stress. Once you locate the source of stress, then the treatment becomes obvious.

Location: 252 W. Swamp Rd., Ste. 26, Doylestown. For more information, call 215-348-2115 or visit Center4NaturalHealing.com. October 2017

Prescription for Beauty: Bonnie McKinley, D.O., Discusses Regenerative Medicine and Aesthetics

Dr. Bonnie McKinley is the founder of Star Advanced Medicine, in Furlong, which offers non-surgical, regenerative orthopedic services alongside regenerative aesthetics.

How do you define regenerative medicine, and how are you using it in your practice?

Regenerative medicine is the regrowing and repairing of injured tissue. Typically, we use proliferative solutions, or the body’s own stem cells or platelets injected into the damaged area, using non-invasive techniques. We offer the Vampire aesthetics procedures, which can be used to treat fine lines, wrinkles, hyperpigmentation, acne scars and even female sexual dysfunction and incontinence.

Why did you pursue a practice in regenerative medicine?

Being certified in sports and musculoskeletal medicine, in conjunction with having an affiliation with Bluetail Medical Group—who are innovators in the field and use research-based methods of treatment—has prepared me to use regenerative treatments for musculoskeletal injuries. Because of the high safety profile and increased number of people that I could help, I became a certified aesthetic provider as well. I found these treatments to be incredible and underused in medicine. This field is rapidly growing and I believe it’s going to change the way medicine is practiced in the future.

In layman’s terms, what is PRP?

Platelet-rich plasma. The process involves drawing blood, which is then spun in a centrifuge, and concentrated platelets are removed and prepared for injection into desired areas. Platelets release growth factors that increase collagen and renew blood flow, healing damaged tissue and rejuvenating skin.

What should people understand about what you do and what are some common misconceptions?

In many cases, these safe, effective treatments are viable alternatives to surgical procedures. However, there are some underlying ailments or comorbid conditions that may affect the way a patient responds to regenerative procedures. I evaluate each patient carefully to determine if PRP/stem cell treatments are a viable option.

A common misconception is that the stem cells we use are taken from human embryos. The stem cells primarily used in the regenerative medicine field come from one’s own body, bone marrow or fat aspirate. There are companies that manufacture products that promote healing which are derived from cord blood as well as amniotic fluid; however, in these cases, the products are donated by mothers, and no one is harmed in the donation process.

Another misconception is that stem cells are illegal. Outside of stem cell manipulation, they are completely legal. Some misconceptions come from recent FDA scrutinization; however, stem cell research is at the forefront of medical research.

How are stem cells used in aesthetics, and how does this differ from fillers and peels that dermatologists and plastic surgeons use?

In aesthetics, PRP is used to “signal” stem cells to migrate to the injection area, unlike orthopedic procedures, where bone marrow and fat grafting is used to regrow injured tissue. Using PRP in aesthetics is enough to create beautiful results. Unlike plastic surgery, it’s completely non-invasive. I am unaware of any major permanent side effects caused by an aesthetic PRP procedure. If you have a skilled injector, non-permanent fillers are generally very safe. When doing the Vampire facelift procedure, I use a filler to sculpt the face, if indicated, in addition to PRP to improve collagen production and skin tone.

What are ways that people can afford regenerative procedures?

We currently offer Care Credit and payment plans, depending on the patient’s financial situation. We’re also in the process of starting a loyalty program. We are more than happy to work with our patients so they can afford these safe and effective treatment options.

Location: 2325 Heritage Center Dr., Ste. 315, Furlong. For more information, call 267-544-0664 or visit StarAdvancedMed.com. October 2017

Who Am I? Where Am I? What Am I Doing Here?: Author, Community Leader Tony Kenton’s Metaphysical Journey

Pennsylvania native Anthony “Tony” Kenton was never one to accept simple explanations to questions about life and human existence. During his formative years, he explored beyond the status quo, and his quest to dig deeper into the enigmas of our world led him to metaphysics—a philosophy that explores the fundamental nature of reality.

“Unfortunately, our society and culture do not provide all the answers to life and our physical reality,” Kenton observes. “To understand life, we must first understand that man is spirit experiencing a human, physical life.”

Metaphysical practices maintain a central role in Kenton’s everyday life. He was president of the New Hope Channelers Support Group (now known as New Hope Metaphysical Society) and, in 1999, he co-founded the Society for Metaphysical Enlightenment (SME) with Rose Moyer, a gifted medium.

SME promotes metaphysics in eastern Pennsylvania and networks with other like-minded groups and organizations throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. Over the years, the study of metaphysics has grown to encompass astrology, meditation, self-help, psychic abilities, numerology and other holistic practices. “There are a lot of ways to help the physical body and mind exist in this physical realm, and these disciplines all help in life’s journey and growth,” Kenton says.

Through SME, Kenton leads a board of six directors to organize expos and events. Its annual fall event, Spiritfest, takes place this year from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., October 28, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., October 29. SME also hosts the Solstice Expo & Holistic Fair each June. Proceeds from both events benefit charities and interfaith churches.

“One of our strong suits is the quality of our speakers,” Kenton says of the expos. “We try to line up the most interesting and challenging speakers that we can get.” High profile lecturers have recently included psychic and author Elizabeth Joyce, numerologist Jack Toffler and Greek clairvoyant Thalia Alexiou.

Kenton believes metaphysical concepts can help others realize that, although negativity can divide the nation and the world, people will inevitably come together. He cites rescue efforts after hurricanes Harvey and Irma as recent examples of how people can work together for good, even in bad situations.

Kenton’s book, Who Am I? Where Am I? What Am I Doing Here?, can be read on the SME website. His forthcoming book works with the premise that we are all one, and that the universe exists mentally first and is then manifested into tangible reality.

“We’re in a physical reality, which is also a duality, so, we are closer to one another than people realize,” Kenton says, adding, “There’s always going to be an element of greed and self-indulgence, but I think we’re on the right track.”

For more information about the Society for Metaphysical Enlightenment or Spiritfest, call 267-261-2768 or visit WeAreSME.com.

Sheila Julson is a Milwaukee-based writer and regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazines throughout the country.