Health is in the ‘Eye’ of the Beholder

Iridology and Sclerology Help Detect Whole-Body Issues

by Michelle Bense

health in eye of beholderWhile proper eye health in itself contributes to improved vision, some specialized practitioners examine the appearance of the eyes to extrapolate the state of other health conditions and systems in the body. These professionals study the colored part, or iris, of the eye—a field known as iridology—and the whites, or sclera, of the eye—known as sclerology.
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Eliminate Stress this Holiday Season with Higher Brain Living

by Michelle Bense

higher brain livingSheryl Goodling, licensed massage therapist, holistic health coach, and Mastery Facilitator of Higher Brain Living, works with women who feel lost, unworthy and stuck in fear. Her business name, Healthy Brain, Healthy Living, reflects her mission: she strives to help women reconnect to their power, discover self-worth and self-love, and begin to create the lives their souls crave.
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Green Street Luxuries and GSL Organics

Skin Care Made Locally, Naturally

by Michelle Bense

gsl productsCandy Pack, a certified aromatherapist, began Green Street Luxuries out of the need to help her own family’s skin problems. “It started to become a business before I knew it was going to be a business,” laughs Pack. When her youngest son was born with severe eczema 24 years ago, she was appalled by the medicines and creams the doctor prescribed to put on her infant’s open wounds. “I read that piece of paper that it came with, front and back—I had to use a magnifying glass because the print was so small.” When she read all the harsh chemicals contained in the tube, Pack says she “threw it right in the trash. I was not putting that on my infant—I wouldn’t put it on myself.”
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Locate and Release Stress in the Body Using Neuro Emotional Technique

by Michelle Bense

NET Susan BurgerStress responses do not live entirely in the brain, as emotional stresses. Other parts of the body can hold stress responses as well—think of the feelings of “butterflies” in the stomach or a “lump” in the throat. Neuro emotional technique (NET) can identify where those negative response patterns exist—whether we are aware of it or not—and help release them.
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EZLifescan Offers Thermography in a Comfortable Setting

by Michelle Bense

ezlifescan bsEZLifescan was founded by Dr. Jo Ellen Halteman, a chiropractor in search of a safer, healthier method to monitor her own breast health—ideally one free of radiation and compression. Her answer came when she found medical Digital Thermal Imaging (DITI)—a safe and accurate screening tool with no physical contact, no pain and no side effects to the rest of the body.
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Manna on Main Street Works to End Hunger

by Michelle Bense

manna on main streetManna on Main Street, headquartered in Lansdale, is committed to ending hunger in the North Penn region by providing food, fulfilling social service and education needs and conducting community outreach. Through its food pantry and soup kitchen, emergency financial aid, counseling and education opportunities, they serve those in need with the hope “that everyone might be fed”.
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Transformation Yoga Project Uses Yoga to Heal Addiction and Trauma

by Michelle Bense

TYP Michael Huggins 4

Michael Huggins

Since his firsthand experiences in stressful and traumatic situations like prison, Michael Huggins, RYT, learned that yoga can work wonders. His nonprofit, Transformation Yoga Project (TYP), now offers yoga classes in prisons and detention centers, drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers, as well as to veterans and other unique groups.
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Anti-Aging Medicine

Dr. Monica Gavin and Pharmacist Mario Sellecchia

by Julianne Hale and Michelle Bense

After a firsthand experience with the symptoms of menopause, Monica Gavin, M.D., developed an interest in anti-aging medicine. “I had every symptom possible—lack of sleep, mood swings, increased abdominal fat and decreased energy,” she explains. “I went to my gynecologist and she did not offer any solutions except progesterone.”
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Reaping What We Sow

Preparing for a Rich Harvest of Local Natural Foods

by Reid Boyer and Michelle Bense

We are what we eat. Simple, yet profound, it means eating healthy foods leads to enjoying a healthy life. Though we are aware of this absolute truth, current lifestyles reflect convenience and rock-bottom prices at the expense of our health, environment and local farming heritage. As a society, we have globalized our diets at the cost of the extinction of numerous plant species and burdened our environment with fertilizers, pesticides and the impact of transporting food from all points of the globe.
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Sustainable Home Renovations Made Easy

Eco Spotlight

by Michelle Bense

environmental home storeSince 2009, the Environmental Home Store (EHS), in Doylestown, has worked hard to make sustainable living and working accessible and affordable. All of their products for kitchen and bath remodeling are environmentally friendly, with free design help and installation available.
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APRIL 2015: Nature’s Wisdom, Table of Contents

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or see Table of Contents below

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Letter from Editor, March 2015

In a well-timed twist of fate, while beginning to work on this animal-centric issue of Natural Awakenings, I had an opportunity to adopt a pet myself. Browsing Craigslist pet notices on a whim last month, my boyfriend and I came across Harley, a 2-year-old German shepherd mix in need of a home. A couple of college students had rescued her from previous owners that had left her outside in multiple snowstorms and generally didn’t give her the love she deserves.

We agreed to foster this unknown dog for a week, and a month later she’s become our best buddy. Working from home can be lonely at times, but now Harley keeps me smiling and entertained. I’m thankful for her company, goofy smile and ability to get me out of the house for spirited walks in the sunshine.

As I read Sandra Murphy’s article, “Mission: Animal Rescue,” on page 16, I am also reminded of an earlier rescue mission at age 12, when I brought home a litter of abandoned kittens—a small piece of our neighborhood’s community cat problem. I happily nursed them as my own and found all of them homes—except for Sadie, who is still the apple of my family’s eye. I often wonder what fate may have befallen her had she not come to live with us; for other stray animals’ sakes I hope there are always animal-loving kids and their parents willing to help.

Even now as I write, Harley’s nose is peeking out from beneath the desk chair, snoozing away the afternoon. I’ve learned that she and I have much in common. We both love bacon and peanut butter, blanket forts, learning new things and digging in the dirt.

With spring’s growing season just around the corner, I encourage you to check out the community supported agriculture (CSA) listings on pages 12 and 13. Like many of us, I would love to be able to grow all of my own food at home. From the limited experience I’ve had cultivating peppers, tomatoes and zucchini, I know how rewarding—and challenging—gardening can be. This year, with a new dog that likes to dig, I may need to rely mostly on a CSA program for organically grown produce.

Spring is a favorite season for so many because it signals new beginnings. Seeds sprout with delicious promise, the first flowers bloom, baby animals are born and beautiful weather brings us all out of hibernation. Maybe it’s also the right time to give an animal in need a new beginning with your family—a good deed that will return delightful dividends.

To all the other Harleys hoping for a good home,
Michelle

Michelle Bense, Managing Editor


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